Category: yellowstone

Happy National Bison Day! Our national mammal …

Happy National Bison Day! Our national mammal is a shaggy symbol of strength and resilience. Public lands managed by Interior support 17 bison herds – or approximately 10,000 bison – in 12 states, including Alaska. Check out more interesting facts about bison: http://on.doi.gov/1Oc7VXg Photo of a bison at Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming by Jacob W. Frank, National Park Service.

Happy birthday to the National Park Service! F…

Happy birthday to the National Park Service! For 102 years, the Park Service’s dedicated rangers, maintenance workers, law enforcement officers, scientists, staff and volunteers have worked to protect and preserve our national treasures. From places of incredible historical impact to icons of natural beauty, our national parks have amazed millions of visitors and will inspire generations to come. Photo of the first national park – Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming – by Bianca Klein, National Park Service.

Watch out for bison jams at Yellowstone Nation…

Watch out for bison jams at Yellowstone National Park. As nice as wildlife like bison look, they’re wild and unpredictable. Remember to never approach wildlife. The safest – and often best – view of wildlife is from inside a car. Always stay at least 100 yards away from bears and wolves, and at least 25 yards away from all other animals, including bison and elk. Be sure to stay in your vehicle if you encounter a wildlife jam, and do not feed wildlife. Animals that become dependent on human food may become aggressive toward people and have to be killed. Take the #YellowstonePledge to protect the landscape, wildlife and yourself at our nation’s first park. Photo by National Park Service.

It’s easy to see why America’s public lands ar…

It’s easy to see why America’s public lands are called national treasures, with stunning views like this shot at Yellowstone National Park! While we can’t promise you’ll find a pot of gold at the end of every rainbow, you might find a bison 😀. Happy St. Patrick’s Day! Photo courtesy of Christina Adele Warburg. 

On March 1, 1872, Yellowstone National Park wa…

On March 1, 1872, Yellowstone National Park was born – making it the world’s first national park. Today, millions visit Yellowstone to discover the park’s geysers and mud pots, forests and lakes, and historic cabins and prehistoric sites – not to mention it’s stunning waterfalls. Check out 7 surprising facts about Yellowstone as we celebrate the park’s birthday: http://on.doi.gov/24zbV9d 

Photo of Lower Falls courtesy of Stuart Burnett.

Love is an adventure, especially when it finds…

Love is an adventure, especially when it finds its way to national parks, wildlife refuges and other public lands. Each year, these special places make the perfect backdrop for proposals and weddings. Today we celebrate the romantic moments loved ones share on public lands. Photo of Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming courtesy of Daniel McLaughlin.

americasgreatoutdoors:A new day starts at Yell…

americasgreatoutdoors:

A new day starts at Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming as the moon sets behind a mountain shining with alpenglow. It’s just another magical moment from this remarkable natural treasure. Photo by Jacob W. Frank, National Park Service.

Happy New Year’s Eve! 🎊🎉🎊 

We’re ending the year with our most popular post in 2017: A full moon at Yellowstone National Park.  It’s just another magical moment from this remarkable natural treasure. Photo by Jacob W. Frank, National Park Service.

“Share the road” takes on a whole new meaning …

“Share the road” takes on a whole new meaning at Yellowstone National Park. It’s not uncommon to have to wait for bison to pass on the roads, like this large, frost-covered bison slowly walking down the road near the Yellowstone River. Video by Jacob W. Frank, National Park Service.

Take a walk through a winter wonderland at Yel…

Take a walk through a winter wonderland at Yellowstone National Park. While it looks a light coating of snow at Tangled Creek, the landscape is covered in hoar frost, which forms when water vapor freezes quickly creating delicate, feather-like crystals. Photo by Jacob W. Frank, National Park Service.

It might be fall, but now is a good time to start planning your…

It might be fall, but now is a good time to start planning your summer trip to Yellowstone National Park. Yellowstone hosts over 4 million visits a year and more than half of these happen June-August. Arrive early, stay late and if you walk half a mile from your car, you’ll leave the crowds behind (in most cases). And be sure to take the #YellowstonePledge to protect this park for current and future generations. Summer photo of Trout Lake by Jacob W. Frank, National Park Service.