Category: mountains

What are you doing for National Get Outdoors D…

What are you doing for National Get Outdoors Day? If you’re a fan of public lands, you could frolic in the sand at a national seashore, take a peaceful hike in a wilderness area, go bird watching in a wildlife refuge or enjoy breathtaking views at our incredible national parks. These deer at Olympic National Park in Washington seem to have the right idea. Photo by Jason Horstman (www.sharetheexperience.org).

@frauke_hagen

@frauke_hagen

Lightning is one of nature’s most powerful and…

Lightning is one of nature’s most powerful and dangerous forces. In the summer at Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado, you can expect thunderstorms almost every afternoon. Visitors should monitor the weather and postpone outdoor activities when thunderstorms are in the area. Witnessing a lightning storm may be a thrill, but it’s not worth the risk. Photo by Park Volunteer Ann Schonlau, National Park Service.

Start your spring outdoor adventure with a sun…

Start your spring outdoor adventure with a sunrise at Shenandoah National Park in Virginia. With waterfalls, wildlife, history, hiking trails and amazing views along the famous Skyline Drive, the park is a feast for your eyes and spirit, and will keep you coming back for more. Photo from Thornton Hollow Overlook by N. Lewis, National Park Service.

As the snow melts on the rugged peaks of Kit C…

As the snow melts on the rugged peaks of Kit Carson Mountain, water flows into seasonal creeks, weaving through valleys and around the massive Star Dune at Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve in Colorado. The water, sand and stone catch the light and show unique textures that make photos of the park often look like oil paintings. Taking pictures, making memories and learning the stories are great ways to experience this unique park. Photo by Patrick Myers, National Park Service.

Like waves rolling on the ocean, layers of rid…

Like waves rolling on the ocean, layers of ridgelines at Great Smoky Mountains National Park  extend out to a stunning sunrise. On the Tennessee-North Carolina border, Clingman’s Dome is the highest point in the park and a premier destination for photographers. Inspired by Ansel Adams and a lover of national park, photographer Zack Knudsen captured this amazing moment in the park a few weeks ago. Photo courtesy of Zack Knudsen

Grab your hiking boots and get ready for sprin…

Grab your hiking boots and get ready for spring at North Cascades National Park in Washington. You’ll feel the burn getting up to Easy Peak, but a view of Whatcom Peak and Mt. Challenger in the distance, it’s like standing on top of the world. Say hi to the mountain goats! Photo by National Park Service.

There are no roads to Lake Clark National Park…

There are no roads to Lake Clark National Park and Preserve in Alaska. Visitors arrive by plane or boat to discover a stunning wilderness of snow capped mountain ranges, rich forests, turquoise lakes and incredible wildlife. The size and beauty of Lake Clark is overwhelming, promising the intrepid an experience of a lifetime. Photo by K. Miller, National Park Service.

It’s National Park Week! From sea to shining s…

It’s National Park Week! From sea to shining sea, from North America’s lowest point at Death Valley National Park in California to the highest peak on the continent at Denali National Park in Alaska, your national parks showcase some of the most stunning landscapes in the world. If you need another example, here’s an incredible view at Glacier National Park in Montana. Check in with us throughout the week to see if we feature your favorite park. Photo by Jacob W. Frank, National Park Service.

Here’s a look into the future at Wrangell-St. …

Here’s a look into the future at Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve in Alaska. Green hillsides and spring showers are still months away at our country’s largest national park, but that doesn’t mean we can’t dream of endless mountain views under the midnight sun. If this doesn’t inspire you to start planning your trip, we don’t know what will. Photo by Neal Herbert, National Park Service.