Category: montana

President Theodore Roosevelt established the N…

President Theodore Roosevelt established the National Bison Range on May 23, 1908, when he signed legislation authorizing funds to purchase suitable land for the conservation of bison – making it the first time that Congress appropriated tax dollars to buy land specifically to conserve wildlife. Since then, the National Bison Range in Montana has played an important role in the successful recovery of these magnificent animals. Today, 350-500 bison call this refuge home. Photo courtesy of Bob Wick.

The baby bison at the National Bison Range Ref…

The baby bison at the National Bison Range Refuge Complex in Montana – often called “red dogs” because of their size and color – are growing quickly. Still not drifting too far from their mothers, they’re eating lots of spring greens and starting to form their distinctive shoulder humps. The refuge’s bison herd numbers over 300 and draws visitors year round to see these majestic animals and the beautiful landscape. Photo by Bureau of Land Management.

Happy National Trails Day – a perfect day to h…

Happy National Trails Day – a perfect day to hit a trail on public lands! There are nearly 60,000 miles of trails that honor our country’s diverse landscape and history, and these provide the public with vital access to the outdoors. Whether you like to walk, hike, ride horseback, or bicycle, there is a trail for you! Check out some awesome trails to #FindYourWay: https://on.doi.gov/2sinOTe.

Photo of the popular Highline Trail at Glacier National Park by Tim Rains, National Park Service.

It’s Great Outdoors Month – a time to co…

It’s Great Outdoors Month – a time to connect with nature whether it’s in your backyards, along trails or on the water. At Upper Missouri Wild and Scenic River in Montana (pictured here), canoeists can float from several days to weeks, following in the footsteps of famous explorers Lewis and Clark as they traverse the geological folds and faults of “Breaks” country. The roadless canyon boasts broad vistas where fishermen are likely to catch goldeye, drum, sauger, walleye, northern pike, channel catfish, carp, smallmouth buffalo and paddlefish. Floaters might even spot some of the many elk and mule deer that inhabit the area, or they can scan the cliffs to get a glimpse of Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep. Photo by Roland Taylor (www.sharetheexperience.org).

Happy birthday, Glacier National Park! On this…

Happy birthday, Glacier National Park! On this day in 1910, President William Taft signed a bill into law establishing this Montana park – making it our nation’s 10th national park. 108 years later, Glacier remains the Crown of the Continent with glacier-carved peaks and valleys, pristine turquoise lakes and streams, and dense ancient forests for all to enjoy: https://on.doi.gov/glacier. What is your favorite memory at Glacier?

Photo of Wild Goose Island by Jacob W. Frank, National Park Service.

It’s National Park Week! From sea to shining s…

It’s National Park Week! From sea to shining sea, from North America’s lowest point at Death Valley National Park in California to the highest peak on the continent at Denali National Park in Alaska, your national parks showcase some of the most stunning landscapes in the world. If you need another example, here’s an incredible view at Glacier National Park in Montana. Check in with us throughout the week to see if we feature your favorite park. Photo by Jacob W. Frank, National Park Service.

Here’s a great view from Bighorn Canyon Nation…

Here’s a great view from Bighorn Canyon National Recreation Area on the Wyoming-Montana border. From the fabulous Pryor Mountain wild horses to majestic bighorn sheep, hundreds of bird species and a world-class fishery, Bighorn Canyon is an excellent destination for outdoors lovers. The centerpiece of the 68,000 acre recreation area is the canyon itself, boasting steep walls as deep as 2,500 feet in some locations. It’s quite a sight from hiking trails on the canyon rim or from a boat drifting on the river below. Photo by Todd Johnson, National Park Service.

A group of river otters is called a romp. Comm…

A group of river otters is called a romp. Commonly found in the South, Great Lakes region and in the Pacific Northwest, this romp was spotted hanging out at Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge in Montana. While they engage in playful behavior with each other, they are deadly hunters and can be dangerous when their territory is invaded. Please enjoy watching them from a distance. Photo by James Perdue, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, @usfwsmtnprairie.

It’s easy to see why America’s public lands ar…

It’s easy to see why America’s public lands are called national treasures, with stunning views like this shot at Yellowstone National Park! While we can’t promise you’ll find a pot of gold at the end of every rainbow, you might find a bison 😀. Happy St. Patrick’s Day! Photo courtesy of Christina Adele Warburg. 

On March 1, 1872, Yellowstone National Park wa…

On March 1, 1872, Yellowstone National Park was born – making it the world’s first national park. Today, millions visit Yellowstone to discover the park’s geysers and mud pots, forests and lakes, and historic cabins and prehistoric sites – not to mention it’s stunning waterfalls. Check out 7 surprising facts about Yellowstone as we celebrate the park’s birthday: http://on.doi.gov/24zbV9d 

Photo of Lower Falls courtesy of Stuart Burnett.