Category: bison

President Theodore Roosevelt established the N…

President Theodore Roosevelt established the National Bison Range on May 23, 1908, when he signed legislation authorizing funds to purchase suitable land for the conservation of bison – making it the first time that Congress appropriated tax dollars to buy land specifically to conserve wildlife. Since then, the National Bison Range in Montana has played an important role in the successful recovery of these magnificent animals. Today, 350-500 bison call this refuge home. Photo courtesy of Bob Wick.

Watch out for bison jams at Yellowstone Nation…

Watch out for bison jams at Yellowstone National Park. As nice as wildlife like bison look, they’re wild and unpredictable. Remember to never approach wildlife. The safest – and often best – view of wildlife is from inside a car. Always stay at least 100 yards away from bears and wolves, and at least 25 yards away from all other animals, including bison and elk. Be sure to stay in your vehicle if you encounter a wildlife jam, and do not feed wildlife. Animals that become dependent on human food may become aggressive toward people and have to be killed. Take the #YellowstonePledge to protect the landscape, wildlife and yourself at our nation’s first park. Photo by National Park Service.

The baby bison at the National Bison Range Ref…

The baby bison at the National Bison Range Refuge Complex in Montana – often called “red dogs” because of their size and color – are growing quickly. Still not drifting too far from their mothers, they’re eating lots of spring greens and starting to form their distinctive shoulder humps. The refuge’s bison herd numbers over 300 and draws visitors year round to see these majestic animals and the beautiful landscape. Photo by Bureau of Land Management.

It’s the best time of year! The first baby bis…

It’s the best time of year! The first baby bison of spring was recently spotted at Wind Cave National Park in South Dakota. Calves are orange-red in color, earning them the nickname “red dogs.” They can walk within 3 hours of birth, and before long, nursery groups of calves will romp around together, never far from their mothers’ watchful eyes. Check out more bison facts: http://on.doi.gov/1Oc7VXg Photo by National Park Service.

It’s easy to see why America’s public lands ar…

It’s easy to see why America’s public lands are called national treasures, with stunning views like this shot at Yellowstone National Park! While we can’t promise you’ll find a pot of gold at the end of every rainbow, you might find a bison 😀. Happy St. Patrick’s Day! Photo courtesy of Christina Adele Warburg. 

The Niobrara Valley in Nebraska is home to For…

The Niobrara Valley in Nebraska is home to Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge and 76 miles of the Niobrara National Scenic River. The valley boasts dramatic bluffs, gorgeous waterfalls, world-class fossil resources, rich forests, wide grasslands and incredible wildlife diversity. Over 350 bison live on the refuge, letting visitors enjoy iconic scenes like this sunset. Photo by Kristen Maxfield, National Park Service.

“Share the road” takes on a whole new meaning …

“Share the road” takes on a whole new meaning at Yellowstone National Park. It’s not uncommon to have to wait for bison to pass on the roads, like this large, frost-covered bison slowly walking down the road near the Yellowstone River. Video by Jacob W. Frank, National Park Service.

Happy National Bison Day! We’re celebrating our national mammal…

Happy National Bison Day! 

We’re celebrating our national mammal with this pic of a bison and its baby at Colorado’s Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge. Public lands managed by Interior support 17 bison herds – or approximately 10,000 bison – in 12 states, including Alaska. 

Check out more interesting facts about bison:  http://on.doi.gov/1Oc7VXg 

Photo courtesy of Rich Keen, DPRA.

From a population of 30 to 60 million animals roaming across…

From a population of 30 to 60 million animals roaming across North America, bison reached a low of about 100 in the wild in the late 1800s. In 1908, President Theodore Roosevelt established the National Bison Range in Montana to maintain a representative herd of bison under natural conditions. Today, approximately 400 bison live in the refuge, enjoying the rolling grasslands. Photo by Justin Schöen (www.sharetheexperience.org).

If not for the foresight of a few individuals including Theodore…

If not for the foresight of a few individuals including Theodore Roosevelt, the American bison could have become extinct. Hunted to the edge of annihilation, by the early 20th century only a few small herds remained. In 1956, 29 bison were brought from Fort Niobrara National Wildlife Refuge in Nebraska and released in Theodore Roosevelt National Park in North Dakota. Here they roam freely on 46,000 acres and number in the hundreds. Photo by National Park Service.