Category: alaska

Winters can be harsh, though starkly beautiful…

Winters can be harsh, though starkly beautiful at Denali National Park and Preserve in Alaska. Temperatures can be well below 0 degrees F by November, and on the winter solstice, Denali receives less than 5 hours of true daylight. Those who venture to the park in winter will find plenty to do – from skiing and winter biking to mushing and snowmobiling. Photo by Katie Thoresen, National Park Service.

We hope you enjoy the weekend as much as this …

We hope you enjoy the weekend as much as this fox playing King of the Hill at Lake Clark National Park and Preserve in Alaska. Photo by J. Mills, National Park Service.

Located just an hour’s drive from Fairbanks, A…

Located just an hour’s drive from Fairbanks, Alaska, the one-million-acre White Mountains National Recreation Area offers stunning scenery, peaceful solitude, and outstanding opportunities for year-round recreation. Summer visitors to the White Mountains pan for gold, fish, hike and camp under Alaska’s midnight sun. In winter, visitors travel by ski, snowshoe, dog team and snowmobile to enjoy the 12 public-use cabins, 250 miles of groomed trails and the spectacular sight of the Northern Lights dancing overhead. Photo by Bob Wick, Bureau of Land Management, @mypubliclands

Happy Thanksgiving! We’re thankful for public …

Happy Thanksgiving! We’re thankful for public lands and all the wonder they provide. Did you know that Benjamin Franklin advocated for the turkey to be our national bird? Thankfully, the majestic bald eagle was chosen instead. Photo from Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve in Alaska by Stewart Brackett (www.sharetheexperience.org).

Katmai National Park and Preserve is world-renown for brown bear…

Katmai National Park and Preserve is world-renown for brown bear viewing. About 2,200 brown bears are estimated to inhabit the park, and more bears than people are estimated to live on Alaska Peninsula. For those who visit the park (or are frequent viewers of #BearCam), they can learn about a bear’s behavior – like this mama and her three cubs standing up. Bear cubs often imitate their mother’s every move, and standing on hind legs allows bears to get a better view or smell of what’s around them. Photo by A. Ramos, National Park Service.

Bering Land Bridge National Preserve in Alaska erupts with color…

Bering Land Bridge National Preserve in Alaska erupts with color during the short fall season. You can find more than gorgeous views and amazing wildlife here, though. Field research continues to uncover evidence of prehistoric animals and the first people to settle the continent. Photo by Katie Cullen, National Park Service.

Last week, the Northern Lights were shining bright over…

Last week, the Northern Lights were shining bright over Yukon-Charley Rivers National Preserve in Alaska. On dark, clear nights, there’s nothing quite like watching the aurora borealis reflect off the mighty Yukon River. Photo by Jake Wiley, National Park Service.

If you like taking the road less traveled, the Nabesna Road at…

If you like taking the road less traveled, the Nabesna Road at Alaska’s Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve might be right for you. Along the way, you’ll find scenic vistas, hiking routes and wildlife viewing, but you won’t find many people. Photo from Dead Dog Hill by Bryan Petrtyl, National Park Service.

It’s National Public Lands Day! Today is the perfect time to get…

It’s National Public Lands Day! Today is the perfect time to get out and explore parks, refuges and wilderness areas near you. There are also thousands of volunteer events across the country and fees are waived, so head outdoors and enjoy some active time in nature. Photo from Kenai National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Fascinating animals, muskoxen look like survivors of the Ice…

Fascinating animals, muskoxen look like survivors of the Ice Age. Whiles other arctic animals spend their winter in hibernation, muskoxen live in open, unsheltered tundra enduring the unforgiving elements that come their way. One secret to muskoxen survival is their two layers of fur – a very long outer layer of fur that looks like hair and a short fuzzy underlayer of qiviut. You can find muskoxen on several public lands in Alaska, including Cape Krusenstern National Monument. Photo by Doug Demarest, National Park Service.